Monthly Archives - December 2018

December 2018 Newsletter

NEWSLETTER - December 2018

Contents derived from www.getaway.co.za (activities 1-9) and www.livingandloving.co.za (activities 10-12)

Don’t sweat it, there is plenty to keep little ones busy and entertained.

1. Go tobogganing in Durbanville at Cool Runnings. It involves planting your bum on a bob-sled and speeding down the hillside on a 1.2-kilometre steel-pipe track. The speed of all the toboggans is brake-controlled and the rides are very safe for children. Little ones under the age of eight have to be accompanied by an adult. One ride for children costs R40 (up to age 14) and one ride for adults costs R50, with an unlimited day pass costing R280.
Contact: 0219494439 / ops@cool-runnings.co.za


Image by John Macgregor

2. The Book Lounge, City Centre in Roeland Street has a free story telling session, perfect for 3-8-year-olds every Saturday at 11:00. While your little one is enthralled by magical tales, you can sit downstairs and enjoy a cuppa at their coffee shop
Contact: 0214622425, booklounge@gmail.com
Visit: booklounge.co.za

3. Planet Kids, Muizenberg has jumping castles, an intergalactic ball wall, fun ramps with a space slide, an outside area with a foefie slide and dream swing, as well as various workshops and other activities. Refreshments can be ordered from the Flying Saucer Cafe, where grown-ups can sit and enjoy a coffee while browsing through a magazine. You can also drop the kids off and fetch them later. Kids aged 2 to 13 pay R35 for the first hour or R60 for two hours. Children under 2 years (10 to 23 months) pay R25 for an hour. Adults are free. Cash or EFT only, no credit cards. More pricing options available. Please check the Planet Kids websitefor more details.
Contact: 0217883070, info@planetkids.co.za
Visit: planetkids.co.za

4. Acrobranch, Constantia consists of three courses, each one equipped with zip lines, sing bridges and Tarzan swings. The courses are family-friendly and safe for children as young as three years of age. The “Yellow Course” is for children ages three and up while the “Green Course” is for children seven years and older. The “Blue Course” includes the other two courses and is for older acrobranchers. If this seems like your kind of fun be sure to check it out. R100 to R180 depending on the course.
Contact: 0212011121
Visit: acrobranch.co.za

5. The Clay Cafe in Hout Bay makes for a day of creativity and recreation for children and parents alike. Choose from a vast array of unfired bisque and a wide selection of colourful paints to create crockery that is both personal and unique. There is a garden and playground outside so once children are finished painting there is still plenty to explore. R35 studio fee, plus the price of whichever item you decide to paint, ranging from R20 to R250.
Contact: 0217903318, info@claytcafe.co.za
Visit: claycafe.co.za

6. Visit the immaculate lawns of Kirstenbosch National Botanical Gardens – the giant trees over the Skeleton Stream, which provide lots of exciting climbing for young adventurers. A raised walkway, named The Boomslang, built through the Arboretum, between the Protea Garden, Cycad Amphitheatre, the Dell, Mathews Rockery and the Concert Lawn. The boardwalk raises visitors to over 12m above ground, and winds like a snake, dipping through the trees. Adults – R60, kids (aged 6-17) – R15, kids under 6 years of age – free. Students (with card) – R30.
Contact: 0217998899, info@sanbi.org.za
Visit: www.sanbi.org

7. City Sightseeing Bus, Cape Town. You can sit and watch the world go by and hop on and off at various places of interest. If you actually listen to the commentary, you will learn a lot about the city we live in and there’s a kid-friendly version too (that’s actually very clever, informative and amusing). Don’t let rain put you off, it’s dry in there! All children get a free activity pack with a colouring-in book and crayons which helps keep them occupied. One day pass: Adults – R170, Kids (aged 5-15) – R90 (when you buy online). Kids under 5 – free.
Contact: 0215116000, info@citysightseeing.co.za
Visit: citysightseeing.co.za

8. The Company’s Garden is a great free spot for families. You can picnic on the grass, play ball games and feed the squirrels and (inevitably) the pigeons. Be aware though that squirrels have sharp little claws! I have seen a few children burst into tears when one of the cute little critters decides to scramble up their bare leg in search of peanuts. The Company’s Garden Restaurant in the park also serves good food, and the outside section is full of interesting things to keep kids busy. You’ll find The Company’s Garden in Queen Victoria Street, at the top end of Adderley Street.
Contact: 0214002521
Visit: thecompanysgarden.com

9. Want your kids to cook but don’t want to clean up afterwards? Take them to Tots ’n Pots where they can fling flour and bash butter to their hearts’ content. These cooking classes are run by incredibly patient teachers and chefs around the peninsula – try the Constantia branch run by Deirdre Cargill who loves the hands-on element in cooking. There are many lessons your kids will learn without realising it, but the main aim is to have fun. And they do – whether it’s the actual mixing and stirring, eating their concoctions or decorating their takeaway box – all with mom or dad guiding along the way. Particularly good for smaller kids, you can sign up for a single lesson or a whole course. Some clubs run during the school holidays. They also do birthday parties. There are also branches in Tableview, the Northern Suburbs and the Southern Peninsula. Bookings are essential.
Contact: 0768163892, constantia@totsnpots.com
Visit: www.totsnpots.co.za

10. Plant a small garden together or simply let them dig!
A wonderful educational experience, this simple activity engages almost all the senses. Plus, kids will love the chance to get their hands dirty and spend time in the garden – feeling different textures and simply getting muddy. Take the time to explain how the plants will grow once you’ve planted them, and let them water their new shrubs afterwards.

11. Bake biscuits and decorate them
Although this idea isn’t new, it’s a firm favourite amongst kids and adults. Who doesn’t enjoy baking and decorating delicious treats that you get to enjoy together afterwards? We love this idea for cold, rainy days where families get to huddle together and munch on the treats in front of a roaring fire or favourite television programme. If you have older kids, you can also turn the washing up into a fun learning experience. Sorting and matching are activities which are central to mathematics, explains Liz. Placing cups on saucers or stacking them together, sorting cutlery or packing away washed bowls and plates in the correct places is a wonderful opportunity to learn.

12. Create a family photo album
Most of our pictures are digital and simply sit on our cellphones or cameras without us ever displaying them at home. Why not make a point of having some family snaps printed and let your child create her very own family album? Let her decorate the pages, while you share stories about each family member. This seemingly simple activity will enhance your child’s memory, as well as encourage her creativity as she decorates each page.

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November 2018 Newsletter

NEWSLETTER - November 2018

Original article from www.cancer.org

Breast cancer occurs mainly in women, but men can get it, too. Many people do not realize that men have breast tissue and that they can develop breast cancer. Cells in nearly any part of the body can become cancer and can spread to other areas.

Breast cancer starts when cells in the breast begin to grow out of control. These cells usually form a tumor that can often be seen on an x-ray or felt as a lump. The tumor is malignant (cancer) if the cells can grow into (invade) surrounding tissues or spread (metastasize) to distant areas of the body.

Male breast tissue

Until puberty (on average around age 9 or 10), young boys and girls have a small amount of breast tissue consisting of a few ducts located under the nipple and areola (area around the nipple). At puberty, a girl’s ovaries make female hormones, causing breast ducts to grow and lobules to form at the ends of ducts. Even after puberty, boys and men normally have low levels of female hormones, and breast tissue doesn’t grow much. Men’s breast tissue has ducts, but only a few if any lobules.

illustration showing structure of the male breast including location of the ducts, areola, nipple, collecting ducts, fatty connective tissue and lobules

Where breast cancer starts

Breast cancers can start from different parts of the breast. Most breast cancers begin in the ducts that carry milk to the nipple (ductal cancers). Some start in the glands that make breast milk (lobular cancers). Men have these ducts and glands, too, even though they aren’t normally functional. There are also types of breast cancer that start in other types of breast cells, but these are less common.

A small number of cancers start in other tissues in the breast. These cancers are called sarcomas and lymphomas and are not really thought of as breast cancers.

Although many types of breast cancer can cause a lump in the breast, not all do. There are other symptoms of breast cancer you should watch for and report to a health care provider.

It’s also important to understand that most breast lumps are benign and not cancer (malignant). Benign breast tumors are abnormal growths, but they do not spread outside of the breast and they are not life threatening. Any breast lump or change needs to be checked by a health care provider to determine whether it is benign or malignant (cancer) and whether it might impact your future cancer risk.

How breast cancer spreads

Breast cancer can spread when the cancer cells get into the blood or lymph system and are carried to other parts of the body.

The lymph system is a network of lymph (or lymphatic) vessels found throughout the body. The lymph vessels carry lymph fluid and connect lymph nodes. Lymph nodes are small, bean-shaped collections of immune system cells. Lymph vessels are like small veins, except that they carry a clear fluid called lymph (instead of blood) away from the breast. Lymph contains tissue fluid and waste products, as well as immune system cells. Breast cancer cells can enter lymph vessels and start to grow in lymph nodes. Most of the lymph vessels of the breast drain into:

  • Lymph nodes under the arm (axillary nodes)
  • Lymph nodes around the collar bone (supraclavicular [above the collar bone] and infraclavicular [below the collar bone] lymph nodes)
  • Lymph nodes inside the chest near the breast bone (internal mammary lymph nodes)

illustration showing lymph nodes in the male breast including location of the supraclavicular, infraclavicular, axillary and internal mammary lymph nodes

If the cancer cells have spread to your lymph nodes, there is a higher chance that the cells could have also traveled through the lymph system and spread (metastasized) to other parts of your body. The more lymph nodes with breast cancer cells, the more likely it is that the cancer may be found in other organs. Because of this, finding cancer in one or more lymph nodes often affects your treatment plan. Usually, surgery to remove one or more lymph nodes will be needed to know whether the cancer has spread.

Still, not all men with cancer cells in their lymph nodes develop metastases to other areas, and some men can have no cancer cells in their lymph nodes and later develop metastases.

Benign breast conditions

Men can also have some benign (not cancerous) breast disorders.

Gynecomastia

Gynecomastia is the most common male breast disorder. It is not a tumor but rather an increase in the amount of a man’s breast tissue. Usually, men have too little breast tissue to be felt or noticed. Gynecomastia can appear as a button-like or disk-like growth under the nipple and areola (the dark circle around the nipple), which can be felt and sometimes seen. Some men have more severe gynecomastia and they may appear to have small breasts. Although gynecomastia is much more common than breast cancer in men, both can be felt as a growth under the nipple, which is why it’s important to have any such lumps checked by your doctor.

Gynecomastia is common among teenage boys because the balance of hormones in the body changes during adolescence. It is also common in older men due to changes in their hormone balance.

In rare cases, gynecomastia occurs because tumors or diseases of certain endocrine (hormone-producing) glands cause a man’s body to make more estrogen (the main female hormone). Men’s glands normally make some estrogen, but not enough to cause breast growth. Diseases of the liver, which is an important organ in male and female hormone metabolism, can change a man’s hormone balance and lead to gynecomastia. Obesity (being extremely overweight) can also cause higher levels of estrogen in men.

Some medicines can cause gynecomastia. These include some drugs used to treat ulcers and heartburn, high blood pressure, heart failure, and psychiatric conditions. Men with gynecomastia should ask their doctors if any medicines they are taking might be causing this condition.

Klinefelter syndrome, a rare genetic condition, can lead to gynecomastia as well as increase a man’s risk of developing breast cancer. This condition is discussed further in Risk Factors for Breast Cancer in Men.

Benign breast tumors

There are many types of benign breast tumors (abnormal lumps or masses of tissue), such as papillomas and fibroadenomas. Benign tumors do not spread outside the breast and are not life threatening. Benign breast tumors are common in women but are very rare in men.

In conclusion

A lot of information can be found on the internet on the topic of male (and female) breast cancer. It is however not safe to only rely on written information. Be aware of any changes in you or your partner’s body and be sure to schedule regular health checks with your medical professional to address any possible concerns or questions you might have.

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