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October 2018 Newsletter

NEWSLETTER - October 2018

Original article by Meg Faure

Having a new baby can wreck havoc with your relationship. The reasons are numerous. Everyone is irritablesleep deprivation does that to you. There is the measuring of ‘who does more’ and the resentment that the other expects so much of you or doesn’t pull their weight. There is the guilt – guilt about leaving to go to work and guilt about feeling angry. It’s a perfect storm. No wonder relationships suffer in the first 3 years of parenthood.

Dad – what can you do?

Firstly, if you are a fixer, you need to park that idea – your wife is not broken – she is exhausted. The situation is not damaged it’s utterly, exhaustingly normal. And all she wants is for you to listen and tell her she is okay and you are there. Just be her rock – not her scissors!

Secondly, acknowledge how tough it is for her. 24/7 with a new baby or up all night and a hectic day job – this is as tough as it gets. Do not try to compete or show that you are also under strain, just acknowledge that this is the toughest thing she has done in her life.

And most importantly know that you are IT – you are the single most important person in her life – it may feel like your baby is but truly, you are the vessel, in which she can be sheltered to do a job she feels inadequate for. Buffer the world and be her quiet place. Hold and contain your partner and baby. It’s the most you can do.

Finally, learn to say sorry – a lot – and laugh whenever you can. I can promise you your wife will return and she will be your true love again. She just needs time to emerge from the quagmire of motherhood in the first 3 years.

Mom – what can you do?

You are exhausted with little time to consider the emotions of others, you are all consumed with your baby – a state we call Primary Maternal Preoccupation.  This is a normal state and will ensure the survival of your baby.

But there is someone else to consider – your partner, the person you dream with, laugh with and who is your love. It’s tough to be dad and feel like the third wheel. He will be wondering when he gets you back and how to reach you.

  • You need to make him part of your parenting journey. Give him a role to play whether it’s the one who holds the baby during horror hour when she wont settle or the one who does the 10pm feed or the one who does bath time. Give your partner a role and do not criticise the way he does it. Make him feel as indispensible as he is.
  • You need to make time to connect – whether its watching a series together or having one date night a week or making the effort to have sex, even when sleep is more attractive. You need to give him space in your life.
  • You need to tell him how vital he is. You know how much you need him so tell him that.

Parenting is not for the faint hearted but its rewards are amazing. Embrace the journey – together.

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June 2018 Newsletter

NEWSLETTER - June 2018

MW-Newsletter-June-2018

Original article from www.attachfromscratch.com

Paternal Bond is life-long relationship between child and father.

Everybody talks about maternal bond, the attachment between mother and a child. While the mother-child bond is super important, the father many times is kinda left out from all the baby touching, bonding, kissing, feeding.

When does the father bonding begin?

There are 3 stages when fathers can bond with their children.

  1. Womb bonding happens during pregnancy. According to the studies, ultrasound can play an important role for a paternal bond. Talking, singing, touching mother’s belly also help for a father to create a bond with a baby.
  2. Birth bonding happens right after birth. It depends on how much father is involved into the labour and whole pregnancy process.
  3. “First soccer practice – age” bonding. If it happens later, don’t sweat it. Better late than never, because the relationship a father will have with his son/daughter will influence child’s life greatly.

TIPS for creating paternal bond

Unfortunately, babies do not come with “instructions how to use”. For many dads a screaming baby with a full diaper might seem like mission impossible. Talk about bonding when the father is scared to hold the baby.

But with the right guidance you will see that there is nothing more natural and pure simple than bonding with your child. So, read these tips and start bonding!

  1. Daily routine care.

Even if you had a long day at work – find few minutes and get involved into:

  • diaper changing,
  • playing,
  • holding (wearing),
  • rocking.
  • baby massage. In fact, recent study shows that baby massage not only helps to bond but also reduces stress for dads.

Babies like company, so just be near your child. Keep him company by giving baby a lot of eye contact and facial expression.

  1. Talk.

According to the study babies (starting when they are 30 weeks in the womb) can distinguish between parents and strangers voices. To fathers luck, their voices are more recognizable than mother’s because of their lower tone which is easier for babies to recognize.

Of course, your baby won’t understand a word you are saying in the beginning, but he will definitely get familiar with your voice tone. Try baby talk – short and simple words or imitate the noises your baby makes.

  1. Hold.

Going for a family walk? Volunteer to carry a baby in a carrier. ‘Baby wearing’ is very beneficial for both: a child and a parent (this case – father).

Skin-to-skin contact is also very important to paternal bonding. Have your newborn lay on your naked chest while you rock in a chair.

  1. Bath.

Taking a bath together with your baby might seem scary because of all that slippery skin and baby fussiness, but with the little mommy help you guys off to fun bath times!

  1. Don’t give up.

Even if a baby screams non-stop and his diaper changing situation is turning into a bomb explosion – you can still do it. Baby needs to trust that you can help him in all situations.  Practice and practice. The more you change that diaper – the better you will get.

  1. Be a good partner to your spouse.

Happy wife – happy life. Try to give her breaks as much as possible, be sensitive and caring.

Paternal Bond is important

We know that mother-child bond is very important but what about father-child bond?

The Benefits of Paternal Bond:

  • increases child’s physical and mental development greatly
  • reduces stress for fathers and babies
  • helps children to be more successful academically
  • reduces drug and alcohol use as well as involvement with crime
  • makes child more social and psychologically stronger.

A father who is bonding with his child shows deep commitment to his family, therefore the relationship between partners gains more trust, becomes deeper and jumps to a whole new level – a parenting level.

Hormones and Chemistry

You think only women have hormones during pregnancy and after birth? Well, here are some news, for you guys too.

According to the study, fathers experience an increase in their levels of these hormones.

Study also found that father’s testosterone levels decrease by one-third immediately after they become fathers, providing a calming effect that may make them less likely to stray from home.

So, it is natural that during women’s pregnancy her partner losses little bit of his strong male attitude and gains more nurturing nature which of course helps a lot for paternal bond process.

So according to the science a father who is involved closely during pregnancy, birth and early infancy will be helped my Mother Nature and its hormones to become sensitive and protective father that not only child and mother will benefit but also the whole society.

This father transformation is one of the most difficult but the most rewarding challenges a man will ever experience. So be confident, get support and feel safe to experience successful paternal bond.

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May 2018 Newsletter

NEWSLETTER - May 2018

MW-Newsletter-May-2018

Original article by Isabelle Dagenais (http://www.motherforlife.com)

What is the foundation of a mother and child relationship? If you bet on unconditional love, read on and find out that even this love can face troubled times.

As for every other aspect of maternity, we don’t know what personality our child will have. We all dream of a lovely baby who only cries when they need something and who can easily be calmed down and you might get lucky… But others will have a child who suffers from colic, gastric reflux or other medical issues. Some babies have “intense needs” and cry for hours every day and no one can satisfy them. This situation can cause suffering and give you a feeling of worthlessness, especially if it happens regularly.

Nevertheless, we must adapt to their ways of showing their needs! Adapting to the temper of our child may take some time, especially if they do not meet our expectations. In this case we must forget about the ideal baby… and one day, we will accept them and things will be better!

What also helps is to realize that we are not responsible for our baby’s temper. If you doubt that babies are born with their own temper, ask the mother of twins and she will tell you how different they were from the beginning. It doesn’t mean that we have no impact on our child! Of course, our perception of the situations, our emotions and reactions influence our child and that is why we should take good care of our emotional state.

Mother-child relationship

Each mother-child relationship is unique and begins long before our child is born.

Remember the time when you desired a child or your thoughts when you realized that you were pregnant. Not to mention your pregnancy and labor…

  • Did you want a child?
  • How did you react to the news?
  • What physical and psychological state were you when you were pregnant?
  • How did the delivery go?
  • How was your first contact?
  • Do you adapt easily to your child’s temper?

Each of those steps was influenced by thoughts and emotions… Each of those steps is part of your lives and of your relationship with your child.

Regret and guilt

Many of you regret some thoughts, emotions or reactions. You wish things had been different and you are afraid of the consequences on your child or on your relationship. Or you feel guilty and you want to fix the “wrongs” that you think you have caused to your child.

Is there a thought or a reaction that you had related to your child and you still couldn’t forgive yourself?

If you have regrets or if you are feeling guilty, it is important to try to forgive yourself and to accept what you have been through. Remember that you acted to the best of your knowledge and that you had no bad intentions. Make peace with the past to avoid dragging this energy into your relationship with your child. Your guilt could influence your behavior or make you feel even guiltier when your child will go through tough times.

To begin feeling better, I suggest an exercise that is in my book. Write a letter to your child and express your regrets, your emotions, your deceptions and the way you feel as a mother. Avoid censorship so that it is truly liberating and once you are done throw the letter away!

Relational challenges

Most people believe that because we wanted a child, our relationship with them will be wonderful! We believe that our love will protect us from problems and conflicts. In fact, love will help us to remain engaged in this relationship when disagreements will occur.

Through their temper, their behavior or their attitude, a child can trigger unwanted emotions. Sometimes, our relationship with our child may be difficult if we are constantly forced to face our limits and our flaws. It is as if some situations were getting to the worst of us. Most of our scars, limits and flaws will be highlighted on this road to motherhood. It is, therefore, necessary to learn to do some soul searching to understand the way we feel and learn from the situation. Blaming our child is never an option.

By taking full responsibility, we build strong foundations to this relationship that we care about so much. Whether we have a baby, a young child or a pre-teen, the goal is to build our relationship every day, to accept their temper, to tolerate a behavior that displeases us, to express compassion for their distress and to do so even if we don’t understand!

In conclusion, I want to share this inspirational quote:

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April 2018 Newsletter

NEWSLETTER - April 2018

MW-Newsletter-April-2018-Top

Original article by Vanessa McEwan, Dietician

Your digestive health is directly impacted by the foods you eat and the lifestyle you live.  By taking steps to improve your digestive health, you’ll help your digestive system to function more efficiently, improving your overall health and sense of well-being.

Try these tips for better digestive health:

  1. Eat less refined sugar.  Among the many issues caused by refined sugar i.e. (inflammation, weight gain, hormonal imbalance…), it also promotes the growth of “bad” bacteria and upset gut flora balance.
  2. Take a quality probiotic.  Probiotics are the same kind of healthy bacteria naturally present in your digestive tract.  They combat the effects of antibiotics, enhance nutrient absorption and strengthen the immune system.

When choosing a probiotic, look for these qualities:

  • Probiotic supplements should contain 5-10 billion CFUs (colony forming units).
  • Encapsulated pills are better than liquids because they help the bacteria survive the acidic stomach.
  • Multiple strains of bacteria (different strains offer different benefits).
  1. Eat a high-fibre diet.  Include whole grains, fruits, vegetables and legumes.  High fibre foods keep your digestive tract regular, making you less likely to get constipated. They can also help prevent digestive conditions such as diverticulosis, hemorrhoids and IBS (Irritable Bowel Syndrome).  In addition, it can help you achieve or maintain a healthy weight.
  2. Stay hydrated.  Drinking plenty of water is good for your digestive health.  Fibre pulls water into the colon to create softer, bulkier stools, allowing them to pass through more easily.
  3. Limit foods that are high in fat.  In general, fatty foods slow down the digestive process but it is important to eat the correct type and amount of fat in your diet to supply the body of EFA (Essential Fatty acids).
  4. Exercise regularly.  Regular exercise helps keep foods moving through your digestive system and helps you maintain a healthy weight.
  5. Eat regularly. Make time to eat.  Aim to sit down for your meals and snacks and NOT to eat on the GO.  By eating the correct foods and portion sizes regularly you will experience less hunger pains and cravings.  Your metabolism will improve and you will maintain a healthy weight and digestive system.

What you eat and the quality of your digestive health are intertwined.  Following these strategies will help make sure it’s a HAPPY relationship!

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March 2018 Newsletter

NEWSLETTER - March 2018

MW-Newsletter-Mar-2018-Header

Original article from Nimue Education SA

Male beard growth is stimulated in the follicles by testosterone as well as the even more powerful male androgen hormone, Dihydrotestosterone.

An analysis of fashion pictures shows that beardlessness began among young men in the 1890’s, during World War I, since beards harboured lice.

Today shaving one’s beard on a daily basis is still a very common practice. A practice that in many cases has many side effects to certain inflammatory conditions such as:

  1. Ingrown Hairs
  2. Pseudofolliculitis barbae (also known as razor bumps/ razor rash)

Ingrown Hairs:

Ingrown hairs develop when the hair curls and grows back into the skin due to incorrect shaving techniques. Individuals with coarse or curly hair have a bigger risk of developing this condition. Shaving a beard can promote development of ingrown hairs and is a big contributing factor. When there’s an ingrown hair, the skin reacts as it would to a foreign body. Typical signs of an ingrown hair are:

  1. Development of bumps which are small, solid with a round shape
  2. Development of pus-filled lesions
  3. The affected area becomes darker, possible post inflammatory hyperpigmentation
  4. Inflammation of the affected area accompanied by itching and pain
  5. Presence of embedded hairs

Pseudofolliculitis Barbae:

Pseudofolliculitis Barbae is an inflammatory disorder caused by persistent irritation, inflammation of the hair follicles and ingrown hair formation after shaving. The condition usually covers part of the beard area (where the individual shaves).

After a hair has been shaved, it begins to grow back. Curly hair tends to curl into the skin instead of straight out of the follicle, leading to an inflammation reaction. Pseudofolliculitis Barbae can make the skin look itchy and red. These inflamed papules and pustules can form if the area becomes infected. If left untreated over time, this can cause keloid scarring in the beard area. Pseudofolliculitis Barbae can further be divided into two types of ingrown hairs: transfollicular and extrafollicular.

  1. Transfollicular

The hair has exited the follicle but then re-enters. While shaving, sharp edges are created. When the hair grows again, it curls and re-enters the skin.

  1. Extrafollicular

The hair does not exit the follicle and because of its natural curly nature, it curls back into the follicle causing fluid build-up and irritation.

Prevention and Treatment

  • Regular exfoliation helps to remove dead skin build-up which may block the entrance/exit of the hair follicle.
  • Nimue facial treatments are great for deeper exfoliation and lightening any scarring and post inflammatory hyperpigmentation.
  • Electric razors should be avoided.
  • When using a wet razor, a single blade or wire-wrapped blade will prevent shaving too closely and changing the blade with every shave will ensure that no bacteria is spread, and the blade does not become blunt.
  • Shave in the direction of the hair growth.
  • Shave every second day, rather than daily.
  • Softening the beard first with a hot, wet cloth or shave while showering in hot water.
  • Picking and scratching the razor bumps must be avoided as this can lead to scarring and infection.
  • Severe transfollicular hairs may require medically attention.
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October 2017 Newsletter

NEWSLETTER - October 2017

MW-Newsletter-Octhead-ext

What is Low Pressure Fitness?

It is a rhythmic breathing exercise system/program set to specific postures and together it creates an anticipatory/automatic response or activation of the deep core musculature. This training system is based on Hypopressives breathing, myofascial and neurodynamic techniques; postural and breathing re-education, combined with the most advanced neuro-educational methodology.

Low Pressure Fitness (LPF) conditions your entire body from the inside out. It is a global approach to training and works on the various muscle chains in the body (anterior, posterior, cross chain etc). All movement starts with the deep core muscles working together as a team to support you in that specific movement. LPF teaches you how to align your body, breathe and activate core function so that your deep core can meet the demands of every move you make and manage intra-abdominal pressure.

How does this work?

It is important to understand the core 4 is a system of deep muscles, working together as a team. This group can be briefly described as the diaphragm, pelvic floor, deep abdominal belt and back muscles. All movement starts from the core and for the core to be functional the system needs to work together, synergistically and in balance. One should also remember that daily life actions like coughing, sneezing, laughing, sport activities like skipping, running or jumping results in intra-abdominal pressure.  If one part of the team is not functioning properly or is out of balance it will also not manage intra-abdominal pressure due to these daily activities and the weakest point or member of the core team will give way or compensate. Symptoms of core dysfunction will be experienced as incontinence, diastasis recti, pelvic organ prolapse, back pain and many more.

 

 

Benefits of Low Pressure Fitness:

  • Toning of the abdomino-perineal muscles and waistline narrowing. Trains deep core muscles at its resting tone. No pulling in of belly or forced tone activation of muscles groups in isolation.
  • Prevention of muscle injury and prevention/maintenance of Hernias (Hiatus, inguinal, vaginal/pelvic organ prolapse)
  • Prevention of pelvic floor dysfunctions eg urinary incontinence (stress urinary incontinence experienced by young athletes is very common and thus, combining this with sport programs offers a great preventative benefit to female athletes). Incontinence is also a symptom experienced by many post-natal and pre and post-menopausal women, so following the LPF program will kick start or retrain your core to become functional, reduce and prevent symptoms of urine leakage.
  • Sexual performance enhancement for men and women
  • Post-natal rehabilitation, eg for diastasis recti/separation six pack muscles due to pregnancy
  • And many more

Where can I find CoreConnect and LPF classes?I received training in Barcelona in 2016 and have been working in and around Cape Town/northern suburbs for a year now. I personally suffered from abdominal separation/Diastasis recti after my second baby and this program offered a significant improvement and rehab tool for the condition. My passion is women’s health and I approach core-pelvic floor, breath and alignment from a fitness, health and wellness perspective. As owner of Core Connect and director of LPF in South Africa, I offer various options for clients either wanting to rehab pre and post-natal, pre and post-menopausal, add this to their regular fitness or exercise program. I offer small beginner groups, maintenance groups where I add full body strengthening workouts, private sessions at home or at general venues or small LPF express groups. I work mainly in and around Cape Town and northern suburbs, but do travel if needed.

I am hosting a women’s event together with my sister, Janet Kimmel, Kegels and Karma, on the 13th of January 2018, the first of many to come. This event will be geared toward women’s health and will be informational, educational, motitvational and fun. It is the perfect way to kick start your year to be balanced, well and motivated. I will be running a workshop on LPF so be sure to have a look at our website and buy your ticket for the event: www.kegelsandkarma.co.za

Where can I find LPF qualified instructors and more information?

The first professional Level 1 course was hosted in Cape Town in May 2017 and there will be a second course running in October. Word is spreading and in 2018 there will be more courses for professionals in Cape Town and in Gauteng. You can find contact details of qualified trainers on the website www.lowpressurefitness.com  or facebook page low pressure fitness south africa.

You can also contact Shirley Boerssen directly for more information on the program, trainers, how to become a trainer and more. Please see contact details below.
Looking forward to meeting and seeing you in my sessions.

Happy Hypos
Shirley Boerssen

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September 2017 Newsletter

NEWSLETTER - September 2017

MW-Newsletter-Sept-2017

Original article by Meg Faure

Newborn babies (under 6 weeks) are generally good sleepers during the day. They are still quite sleepy and may even sleep from one feed to the next. They are very likely to wake to feed as often at night as during the day – usually 3 hourly.

If your baby wakes more often at night than during the day, she may be experiencing ‘day-night reversal’. In this case, you need to guide your baby towards more lively interactions in the day and less engagement at night.

It is relatively simple to improve your baby’s night-time sleep by keeping night feeds strictly business affairs. Here are 5 simple tips to differentiate night-time from day:

  • Unless your baby is premature or your doctor advises you otherwise, don’t wake your baby for feeds at night– take her lead for waking at night. This allows your baby to establish natural sleep cycles.
  • Try not to smile or talk to your baby at night – keep these happy interactions for day light hours.
  • Feed in semi-darkness – use a dimmer, nightlight or a passage light instead of the bright bedroom light.
  • Don’t change your baby’s nappy at night – buy the best nappy you can afford for night-time and leave it on from one feed to the next, unless she has soiled her nappy. A good quality gel nappy can be left on all night as they soak up all the urine and the bottom remains dry.
  • In the very early days (the first 6 weeks), do not ‘dummy’ your baby in an attempt to decrease night feeds. Rather feed her when she wakes for feeds at night, if more than two and a half hours have passed since the last feed.

Follow these simple strategies and in a short time, your baby will start to have one longer stretch between feeds at night and by 3 months should have a good 6-8 hour stretch once at night.

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August 2017 Newsletter

NEWSLETTER - July 2017

MW-Newsletter-Aug-2017
Original article by Meg Faure

Just as you think you have got on top of your baby’s sleep routine, suddenly you will find that he changes the game plan. As your little one gets older, his need for day sleeps become less and so you will find that fitting all the day sleeps into the day with longer awake times, mean that bedtime is suddenly at 10pm.

Research has shown that the more attention given by parents to language development in the early days, the better the child will achieve in later literacy and communication skills.

How do you know when your baby wants to drop a day sleep?

There are four common tell-tale signs that its time to drop a day sleep at about these ages:

  1. Your baby/toddler is suddenly VERY hard to settle to sleep for day sleeps.
  2. Your baby/toddler starts to fight bedtime and it gets later and later because his last sleep of the day goes on too late
  3. Your baby/toddler starts to wake VERY early – like 4am – and won’t go back to sleep
  4. Your baby/toddler wakes at night and stays awake for a long period

When your baby shows one or more of these signs, its may well be time to drop a sleep

How to drop a day sleep

Every age can be done a similar way – incrementally. So lets look at dropping from two to one day sleep: At around a 12-14 months your baby will be at the right age to drop down from two to one day sleep.

  1. Move the morning sleep later – to 10am and the midday sleep to 2pm for a few days.
  2. Then move the morning sleep to 11am (with big snack at 10:30am plus a tiny milk feed – then to sleep). He will be dog tired with the new routine for a few days so you will need to entertain him to get him through to 11am.
  3. On these days, he will probably sleep from 11am until 1pm and not have an afternoon sleep. So bring bedtime back to 6pm.
  4. Every third day do two sleeps if he needs it for 2 weeks.
  5. Then in the third week, move morning sleep to 11:30 and eventually 12. That is your new routine
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July 2017 Newsletter

NEWSLETTER - July 2017

MW-Newsletter-July-2017
Original article by Meg Faure

As parents we spend our lives trying to make sure that we offer our children the best opportunities in life.  We often obsess about their development and compare our babies with others to make sure everything is on track.  One of the biggest indicators about how your baby is doing is the development of their language skills.  Lets look at “typical” language development and how you can encourage your child’s speech.

Research has shown that the more attention given by parents to language development in the early days, the better the child will achieve in later literacy and communication skills.

Babies under six months of age communicate primarily by crying, blinking, smiling and facial expressions.  Your baby will respond to his name, turn his head to human voices and engage in eye to eye contact.  He will vocalize and begin to use intonation in his voices. As he approached the 6 month mark, he starts to learn to take turns and that a conversation is made up of two people ‘talking’ to each other.

By 12 months your baby will be aware of the social value of speech and the effect he has on you.  He will practice using his voice with endless babbling, and may begin to use a few words (or fragments of words) with meaning as he approaches a year of age.

At 18 Months your baby will have a vocabulary of approximately 20 words, mainly naming of toys and people he knows well, but he will continue to develop his language by repeating words or phrases that you say.  He should be able to follow a few simple instructions such as “put it in the box”.

When your baby reaches 2 years of age his vocabulary has exploded to around 300 words.  He will be beginning to put short sentences together, but his fluency is still poor.  He can use some prepositions like inon and under; as well as some pronouns like I, me and you, but he won’t always use them appropriately.

3 year old child can use pronouns correctly and is beginning to experiment with using tenses, but often doesn’t get them right.  Around 90% of what your toddler says at this age is correct and intelligible with a vocabulary of around 1000 words, predominantly made up of verbs.  He understands and can respond to simple questions as well as reason.

By 4 years old your child should be able to name and point to all his body parts, animals, colours, simple shapes and familiar objects in books or magazines.  He has mastered most vowel sounds as well as p, b, m, w and n.  When engaging in play and make believe he often chats endlessly about what he is doing

At 5 years old, your child uses descriptive words with ease and should be completely intelligible.  He has mastered all the vowels as well as m, p, b, h , w, k g, t, d, n, ng and y.  He can put together sentences of up to 9 words and can usually follow a string of 3 commands.  He now understands concepts of time, numbers (up to 10, sometimes more), opposites and size.  He should know his name, age, address and telephone number.

Language guides provided above are guidelines only.  All children are different and will develop at a different pace – if you are concerned about your child’s language development please talk to your paediatrician or a speech therapist who will guide you accordingly.

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June 2017 Newsletter

NEWSLETTER - June 2017

MW-Newsletter-June-2017
Original article by Meg Faure

Your baby is born with a natural immunity that is passed on to him during pregnancy. This wonderful immunity in combination with the antibodies found in colostrum and breast milk protects your baby from illness to a great extent for the first 6 months of life. Over the next few years, your child will be working at developing his immunity so that he can face the germs he will be exposed to in life, without becoming too ill.

Breastfeed

The best way to boost your baby’s immunity in the first year is to breastfeed. Even once your baby is on solids, breast milk continues to carry some of your antibodies to your baby.

Vaccinate

The most important boost of your baby’s immunity is inoculations against dangerous childhood illnesses, such as tetanus, meningitis and whooping cough.

Eat a healthy varied diet

A healthy diet will help to build your baby’s immunity by providing micronutrients. Make sure he eats fruit and veggies as well as fish, meat, nuts and wholegrains – all of these contain vitamins and micronutrients needed for immunity

Supplements

If your baby is a fussy eater (common in the toddler years) it is a good idea to offer a natural supplement, which is best absorbed by the body and provides a wide spectrum of nutrients to ensure that your little one gets everything he needs. Bio-Strath is a natural supplement that provides essential vitamins, minerals and amino acids in an optimal form, to support your little one’s immune system as well as benefit their overall development. In addition, a multivitamin for babies and young children, with Vitamin C and Zinc can help boost immunity.

Exposure

Once your little one is attending crèche or school, he is likely to catch at least 8 infections per year. The next time he is exposed to the same virus the illness is much less severe. This is why children tend to get better and have far fewer infections after the age of 4 years. By this time they have been exposed to the vast majority of normally occurring viruses and the immune system has memory for these viruses.

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